Wednesday, July 11, 2012

2012-07-10 "Banksters #3" by Jan Tucker
For background on this series, check out: []
Here’s an example of a mortgage company getting caught red handed in what appears to be Robo-signing.  In an investigation of a document filed with San Bernardino Superior Court by the Law Offices of Randall Naiman (San Diego), the signatures are not just bizarre, but not even similar, for the same person, Mark Armstead (Vice President of Chase Home Finance LLC):

In California, a declaration under penalty of perjury is required by Section 2015.5 of the Code of Civil Procedure to state the place (i.e., the City or County and State) where the document is signed.  This is especially important when there is a contention that a signature is a forgery.  The requirement enables an investigation into where a signer was at on a particular date to determine if it was even possible for that person to sign the document.  Note that in both cases above (the first in California and the second in Pennsylvania), neither signature identifies where it was signed….conveniently for Chase Home Finance.
In spite of the defect and the fact that it is intuitively obvious that the signatures on these documents don’t match, the Chino Superior Court Judge who heard U.S. Bank’s motion for summary judgment granted it against the homeowner, enabling her eviction.  I have sent copies of these documents to Attorney General Eric Holder, California Attorney General Kamala Harris and I will soon be sending a copy to San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie Doumanis (where the Chase Home Finance office was located and where the signature was theoretically signed) and to San Bernardino County District Attorney Michael A. Ramos.
If justice means anything in this matter, somebody should be going to jail….but I’m not holding my breath.